Lucy Martin

Another day another painting

Another day another painting

#expressionist #painting #portrait

#expressionist #painting #portrait

#painting # figure # paint #expressionism #experimental #colour #workingprogress #studio #artwork #art #portrait

#painting # figure # paint #expressionism #experimental #colour #workingprogress #studio #artwork #art #portrait

#watercolour #sketch #face #expressionist #linea

#watercolour #sketch #face #expressionist #linea

#drawing #face #sketching #art #portrait #fineliner #experimental

#drawing #face #sketching #art #portrait #fineliner #experimental

“Dolly” Acrilic and Oil on canvas
I want to write a quick passage about my thoughts so far..
Recently I’ve been looking at Artists such as Willem De kooning, Goya, Peter Doig, Edvard Munch, Francis Bacon, to name a few. When researching these artists I’ve noticed one trait that they all have in common, which is their undeniably successful ability to mix their own physical reality with their unconscious mind. You could argue all artists have this ability, but so far these have related the most strongly to my own work in particular. I’m interested in creating art that gives an insight into both mind and matter. The reality of vision blended with the distortion of the unconscious, and each of our own memories, thoughts and emotions.
When we see an image, read a piece of writing, listen to some music, that external sensory input is stored in our minds. It essentially becomes a memory. The blending of senses is something that fascinates me. Also how these memories we have gradually change over time as our minds develop.  The representation of something in our mind speaks through visual language when we create. I want to create a language which shows how the world is depicted through my mind, and not only physical representations that we recognize, but through my senses and memories. Essentially the unconscious language of my perception, and my inner reality. The “Dematerialisation” of the physical world (Which Edvard Munch studied in great detail) is something that interests me also. Where does the concious mind end and the unconscious begin? where does our perception end and the true reality of the physical realm begin? Is a chair a solid, straightforward piece of matter, or is it billions of atoms vibrating, and light creating colour in our eyes?  are our brains giving us a false sense of reality, or are they giving us just one small glimpse of it?
 The above image “Dolly” is my representation of Nabokovs Lolita. One of my favourite pieces of literature. Nabokov had synesthesia, so his brain would mix sensory information together. His writing portrays this in such a way that you can feel it with him. He cleverly gives the reader a sense of nostalgia, as if you have lived this life and it’s being retold through your own memory. The dark obsessive mind of the the main character Humburt reminded me of the way that painting brings out that part of everyones mind, sometimes brutal honesty, that you can’t hide behind. It also reminded me of the despair of attatching yourself to a memory, or a feeling/emotion, which despite the disturbing nature of the novel, remains something we can all relate to on a certain level. There are certain images we capture that stick with us, that create a resonance, that we immortalise and make our own, so for that reason I have drawn some momentary inspirtation from this particular book.
“We all have such fateful objects — it may be a recurrent landscape in one case, a number in another — carefully chosen by the gods to attract events of specific significance for us: here shall John always stumble; there shall Jane’s heart always break.”
― Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita

“Dolly”
Acrilic and Oil on canvas

I want to write a quick passage about my thoughts so far..

Recently I’ve been looking at Artists such as Willem De kooning, Goya, Peter Doig, Edvard Munch, Francis Bacon, to name a few. When researching these artists I’ve noticed one trait that they all have in common, which is their undeniably successful ability to mix their own physical reality with their unconscious mind. You could argue all artists have this ability, but so far these have related the most strongly to my own work in particular. I’m interested in creating art that gives an insight into both mind and matter. The reality of vision blended with the distortion of the unconscious, and each of our own memories, thoughts and emotions.

When we see an image, read a piece of writing, listen to some music, that external sensory input is stored in our minds. It essentially becomes a memory. The blending of senses is something that fascinates me. Also how these memories we have gradually change over time as our minds develop.
The representation of something in our mind speaks through visual language when we create. I want to create a language which shows how the world is depicted through my mind, and not only physical representations that we recognize, but through my senses and memories. Essentially the unconscious language of my perception, and my inner reality.
The “Dematerialisation” of the physical world (Which Edvard Munch studied in great detail) is something that interests me also. Where does the concious mind end and the unconscious begin? where does our perception end and the true reality of the physical realm begin? Is a chair a solid, straightforward piece of matter, or is it billions of atoms vibrating, and light creating colour in our eyes?
are our brains giving us a false sense of reality, or are they giving us just one small glimpse of it?


The above image “Dolly” is my representation of Nabokovs Lolita. One of my favourite pieces of literature. Nabokov had synesthesia, so his brain would mix sensory information together. His writing portrays this in such a way that you can feel it with him. He cleverly gives the reader a sense of nostalgia, as if you have lived this life and it’s being retold through your own memory. The dark obsessive mind of the the main character Humburt reminded me of the way that painting brings out that part of everyones mind, sometimes brutal honesty, that you can’t hide behind. It also reminded me of the despair of attatching yourself to a memory, or a feeling/emotion, which despite the disturbing nature of the novel, remains something we can all relate to on a certain level. There are certain images we capture that stick with us, that create a resonance, that we immortalise and make our own, so for that reason I have drawn some momentary inspirtation from this particular book.

“We all have such fateful objects — it may be a recurrent landscape in one case, a number in another — carefully chosen by the gods to attract events of specific significance for us: here shall John always stumble; there shall Jane’s heart always break.”

― Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita

nearly there…

nearly there…